Recent Changes

Monday, January 17

  1. page home edited Welcome to the Mapping the Eighteenth-Century Mind Class Wiki! ... a Spring 2009 2010 course.…
    Welcome to the Mapping the Eighteenth-Century Mind Class Wiki!
    ...
    a Spring 20092010 course. Our
    contemporary scientific discoveries about the mind
    important philosophical writings about the mind in the 1700s, including John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding and David Hume's Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
    (view changes)
    11:03 pm

Thursday, August 19

  1. page space.menu edited ... Information on: The Modern Brain Eighteenth-century Doctors, Doctors, Patients, Thinkers,…
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    Information on:
    The Modern Brain
    Eighteenth-century Doctors,Doctors, Patients, Thinkers,
    Eighteenth-century Medical Procedures and Medications
    Medical Disorders in the Eighteenth Century
    (view changes)
    12:19 pm
  2. page home edited ... Mind Class Wiki Wiki! Here, you will find information about the eighteenth-century mind t…
    ...
    Mind Class WikiWiki!
    Here, you will find information about the eighteenth-century mind that students at Georgia Tech compiled as part of a Spring 2009 course. Our goal in building this wiki was to collect as much reliable information as we could about eighteenth-century philosophies of mind, representations of the mind, and scientific and medical practices related to the brain. Here, you'll be able to find information about:
    contemporary scientific discoveries about the mind
    (view changes)
    12:15 pm
  3. page home edited ... key questions our study of the mind has generated We hope you enjoy our wiki and find it both…
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    key questions our study of the mind has generated
    We hope you enjoy our wiki and find it both useful and illuminating.
    Sincerely,
    The authors:
    1. Which played a bigger role in determining eighteenth-century philosophies of mind: religion or science?
    2. How do eighteenth-century theories of the mind compare to and influence contemporary theories of the mind?
    3. What is the relationship between madness and the mind in the eighteenth century?
    4. Which is more important in eighteenth-century conceptualizations of the mind: nature or nurture?
    5. What do specific medical practices used on the brain in the eighteenth century reveal about theories of mind?
    6. What purpose do eighteenth-century theories of mind serve?
    7. How is the relationship between the mind and the body conceived of in the eighteenth century?
    8. What is the most important cultural or historical context for understanding the eighteenth-century mind?
    9. What’s missing from and what are the limits in eighteenth-century theories of mind? What might these reveal about those theories?
    10. How do eighteenth-century theories of mind influence other things in the 1700s, like literature, art, or music?
    11. What role did class or gender play in eighteenth-century conceptualizations of the mind?
    12. What metaphors dominated eighteenth-century discussions of the mind and why?
    Please don't complete your assignment on this page. Cut and paste your term/person/medical procedure/related topic to the appropriate page and complete the assignment there. Once you've completed your assignment, strike it out.
    Terms
    Alimentary duct (Christine Amuzie)
    Alimentary tubes (Julian Varo)
    Apoplexy (Rachel Patel)
    Apothecary (Christian Cruzen)
    Bile (Mohini Bhalani)
    Bituminous (Christine Amuzie)
    Cachexy (Ryan Schorer)
    Calomel (Christine Amuzie)
    Cathartics (Julian Varo)
    Caustics (Harry Caplan)
    Chimaeras (Amy Lambeth)
    Choler/Colick (Christine Amuzie)
    Confirmed mania (Dustin Smith)
    Consequential Madness (Olivia Steele)
    Convulsion (David Wu)
    Decoction (Christine Amuzie)
    Delirium (Brenden Duncombe-Smith)
    Delusion (Dustin Smith)
    Diaphoretic (Christine Amuzie)
    Duodenum (Matthew Miller)
    Dura mater (Matthew Miller)
    Emeticks/emetics (Mollie Pett)
    Emunctory (Christine Amuzie)
    English Malady (Megumi Takeda)
    Epicures (Brenden Duncombe-Smith)
    Erisipelas (St. Anthony’s Fire) (Gabby Lamas)
    Errhine (Christine Amuzie)
    Eructation (Andrew LeCroy)
    Fanaticism (Patrick Brandt)(Keshav Prasad)
    Frenetic/Phrenetic(Joshua Roberts)
    Gummos cum (James Ruppert)
    Hiera Picra (Joshua Roberts)
    Hypochondriacal/Hypochondriak (Mohini Bhalani)
    Hypostasis (Julian Varo)
    Ideal insanity (Rohan Gupta)
    Ipecacuahana (Andrew LeCroy)
    Jaundice (William Hodges)
    Laming (Rachel Patel)
    Magnesia alba (Mollie Pett)
    meatus auditorius (Mollie Pett)
    Nervous distempers (Harry Caplan)
    Niter (Julian Varo)
    Notional insanity (Rohan Gupta)
    Original Madness (Erika Loupee)
    Parenchyma (Rachel Patel)
    Paroxysm (Christine Amuzie)
    Pathology (Megumi Takeda)
    Pericranium (Hunter Hammond)
    Peripneumony(Mollie Pett)
    Phlegm (Ling Lin)
    Pia mater(Gaby Lamas)
    Plexus choroides (Erika Loupee)
    Sal Diureticus (Christine Amuzie)
    Scorbutick (Christine Amuzie)
    Sineapisms (Annie Macedo)
    Sizyness (Brenden Duncombe-Smith) (Keshav Prasad)
    Spleen (James Ruppert)
    Systasis (Erika Loupee) (Keshav Prasad)
    Tartar(Gaby Lamas)
    Tincture (Patrick Brandt)
    Tumors (Matthew Miller)
    Tunica Arachnoidea (Keshav Prasad)
    Vesicatories (Mollie Pett)
    Viscidity (Rachel Patel)
    People
    Anacreon (Joahua Roberts)
    Andrew Harper (Patrick Brandt)
    Aretaeus (Giuseppe Tambasco)
    Artemidorus of Tarsus (Ian Lopez)
    Dr. Bryan Robinson (Ryan Daly)
    Dr. Mead (Juan San Emeterio)
    Case III- G.H. (Haslam) (Mollie Pett)
    Case VII- A.M. (Haslam )(Hannah Skibiel)
    Case XIV- J.C. (Haslam) (Hannah Skibiel)
    Case XV- J.A. (Haslam) (Chris Sandwich)
    Case XVI- J.H. (Haslam) (Andrew LeCroy)
    Case XIX- W.C. (Haslam) (Ian Lopez)
    Case XX- M.L. (Haslam) (Ian Lopez)
    Case XXII- J.C. (Haslam) (James Rupert)
    Case XXIII- E.I. (Haslam) (Chris Sandwich)
    Case XXVII- T.W. (Haslam) (Megumi Takeda)
    Case XXVIII- R.B. (Haslam) (Raul Alfonso)
    Case XXIX- E.T. (Haslam) (Melissa King)
    Case IA (Pargeter) (Chris Sandwich)
    Case IIA (Pargeter) (Melissa King)
    Case IB (Pargeter) (Melissa King)
    Case IIB (Pargeter) (Mollie Pett)
    George Cheyne (Mohini Bhalani)
    George III (Jon Graham)
    Giovanni Battista Morgagni (Chris Massad)
    James Monro (Disi A)
    James Tilly Matthews (Amber Lee)
    John Haslam (Chris Sandwich)
    John Monro (Amber Lee)
    Mary Toft (AJ Vakharia)
    Niobe (Giuseppe Tambasco)
    Pascal (Joshua Goldstein)
    Theophile Bonet (Mollie Pett)
    Thomas Arnold (Giuseppe Tambasco)
    Thomas Willis (Annie Macedo)
    William Battie (Hannah Skibiel)
    William Cullen (Peymaun Ghafouri-Kia)
    William Pargeter (David Wu)
    Zacutus Lusitanus (Mollie Pett)
    Medical Procedures/Treatments
    Solitary Confinement (Judy Zhao)
    Vomiting (Raul Alfonso)
    Purging (Bryson McNulty)
    Restraint (David Wu)
    Cold bathing (Chrissy Townsend)
    Blood-letting (Bryson McNulty)
    Dietary Changes (Mollie Pett)
    Pargeter's “catching the eye” (Melissa King)
    Opiates (Harry Caplan)
    Evacuation (Keshav Prasad)
    waters of Bath (Raul Alfonso)
    Electricity (Christian Cruzen)
    Rough Catharticks (Keshav Prasad)
    Chamomile (Mollie Pett)
    Tea of Carduus (Joshua Roberts)
    Related Topics:
    St. Luke's Hospital for Lunaticks (Perry Smith)
    Leicester Lunatic Asylum (Lisa Johnson)
    private madhouses(Ryan Daly)
    laws and regulations for madhouses (Dustin Smith)
    abuses of the insane (Chrissy Townsend)
    connection between religion & madness (Methodists- Pargeter) (Melissa King)
    Luxury as a cause of madness (Melissa King)
    Similarities/observations of autopsied brains
    strokes(Ryan Daly)
    Welcome to the Mapping the Mind, 1700-1800 Class Wiki!
    One of the goals of our class is to establish a comprehensive wiki for the texts we're reading. Hopefully, by the end of the semester we'll have the following:
    an overview of every book, section, and chapter we read
    a set of links to sources that will help other students and future visitors understand these texts
    a set of historically accurate contextual information about the authors and topics covered in the course
    a set of compelling discussion questions and interpretations of the texts we're reading
    You are required to update the wiki throughout the course; though there are no specific requirements about the number of edits you need to make, I hope you'll log on daily to make contributions and that your contributions will be substantial and thoughtful. These contributions can take the form of creating new content, or editing and reorganizing the content created by your peers. Twice during the semester, you'll submit a report to me that details your contributions to the wiki. Your contributions are worth 10% of your final grade.

    (view changes)
    12:15 pm
  4. page space.menu edited Home Plagiarism Policy Group Assignments Tasks Standards and Rules for the Wiki Help and How-…
    Home
    Plagiarism Policy
    Group Assignments
    Tasks
    Standards and Rules for the Wiki
    Help and How-To
    Summaries of Key Texts:
    David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
    Henry Mackenzie, Man of Feeling
    John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
    Rita Carter, Mapping the Mind
    Information on:
    The Modern Brain
    The Eighteenth-Century Brain
    People
    Medical
    Eighteenth-century Doctors, Patients, Thinkers, and Writers
    Eighteenth-century Medical
    Procedures and Medications
    Medical Disorders in the Eighteenth Century

    Terms
    RelatedExtended Research on Related Topics
    Disorders

    Works Cited
    (view changes)
    12:14 pm

Monday, May 3

  1. page People edited ... Sources: {1} Britannica Encyclopedia William Pargeter William Pargeter (1760-1810)Parge…
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    Sources:
    {1} Britannica Encyclopedia
    WilliamPargeter
    William
    Pargeter (1760-1810)Pargeter(1760-1810)
    According to the text by Richard Hunter and Ida Macalpine, William Pargeter wasborn in Northamptonshire in 1760, attended Oxford when he was seventeen. In 1786 he received his M.D. from Marischal College. Pargeter was one of the six founding members of the Medical Society of Oxford, which started its first session in 1780. The sessions consisted of multiple meetings lasting two or so hours. During the meetings, members would read papers that pertained to a topic of their interest that related to medicine.
    Sources:
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    6:09 pm
  2. page Terms edited ... According to "Patterns of Madness", cathartic is a purgative medicine, more fierce i…
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    According to "Patterns of Madness", cathartic is a purgative medicine, more fierce in operation than a laxative but less violent than drastic purge.
    Source: Oxford English Dictionary: Cathartic
    ...
    William Battie uses uses the term
    Sources: “William Battie (1703-76): A Treatise on Madness (1758), A: pp. 41-44, B: pp.68-77, C: pp. 93-99.” Patterns of Madness: A Reader. Ed. Allen Ingram. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1998. 164-174; Oxford English Dictionary: Chimaera
    ...
    the ‘four humours’humours ’ of early
    Sources: Oxford English Dictionary: Choler and Patterns of Madness in the 18th Century
    Clyster - (n.) A medicine injected into the rectum, to empty or cleanse the bowels, to afford nutrition, etc.; an injection, enema; sometimes, a suppository.
    ...
    Source: Oxford English Dictionary: Conscience
    Consequential madness - (n.)
    ...
    physician William Battie,Battie , consequential madness
    Sources: William Battie. A Treatise on Madness (1758)
    Convulsion - (n.) A violent fit of laughter.
    (view changes)
    6:07 pm
  3. page People edited ... Joanna Southcott was born in Devon England and raised with strong religious convictions. In 17…
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    Joanna Southcott was born in Devon England and raised with strong religious convictions. In 1792, she claimed that the Lord visited her, and that she is the Woman of the Apocalypse from the prophecy in Revelation. Southcott began to prophesy of the Apocalypse including the return of Jesus and eminent war of nations. She wrote, sealed, and sold these prophecies to her amounting followers that eventually grew greater than 100,000. At the age of 64, Southcott claimed of an immaculate conception in which she carried a son, Shiloh. This child “was to rule all nations with an iron rod. And her son was taken up to God and to his throne,” as foretold in Revelation. Many prepared to receive the child, and after a yearlong pregnancy, Southcott died without giving birth. Upon examination, doctors found no evidence of a child; however, her followers believed that before her death, Shiloh was born in spirit form. Many considered her insane, but she was never treated nor confined.
    Sources: {1} “Joanna Southcott (1750-1814).” Patterns of Madness: A Reader. Ed. Allen Ingram. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1998. 193-207.
    John HaslamJohnHaslam
    John
    Haslam
    {http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/%7Egregh/2000GHgraphics/JohnHaslam.jpg} John Haslam was appointed to the position of Bethlem's apothecary in 1795 and was noted for his intellect and enthusiasm on the job. As apothecary, he delivered the inmates their medicines daily and was therefore able to record the many different behaviors of the inmates. His contributions to the book Patterns of Madness mostly include detailed descriptions of the most peculiar illness that occurred within the walls of Bethlem. Due to his closeness to the mentally insane, he provides perhaps some of the most humane and modern techniques on how to treat the mentally ill in contrast to the current methodologies suggested by practitioners such as Harper. Haslam's medical curiosities lead him to the dissections of the brain after the death of a patient. The date along with the state of the brain were also logged by Haslam for each of his case studies at Bethlem giving the audience a very descriptive record on the inner parts of an unstable brain. John Haslam introduced an energetic look on the practices involving the insane and was drawn to record some of the most bizarre stories. After his publication on the testimonies of James Tilly Matthews, he was dismissed from his post by the House of Commons in 1816 for its controversial allegations.
    Sources:
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    6:02 pm
  4. page People edited ... {1} http://www.pantheon.org/articles/n/niobe.html Back to Top Pargeter Case IAAnchor Ancho…
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    {1} http://www.pantheon.org/articles/n/niobe.html
    Back to Top
    Pargeter Case IAAnchorAnchor P
    Pargeter Case IA

    In this case study, Pargeter studies a farmer from the countryside whose friends had reluctantly put him into a madhouse because they had nothing else to do with him. He had no previous signs of mental illness and his friends noted him as once a cheerful and lively man, but William Pargeter witnessed him in a Melancholy and very distressed state of being. Symptoms also included having "inconsistent conversation" and "deeply concerned about his future state". According to his history, his mental illness originated after his move from the Church to the Methodists. He made this move because he was scolded by a clergyman in front of the congregation and was so upset by this occurrence that he felt it necessary to leave the Church only to join the Methodists. Pargeter never explicitly says that this is the cause of his illness, but he notes the convenience of his move to the Methodist Church and the time his mental illness was first prevalent.
    Sources:
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    5:51 pm
  5. page People edited ... Sources: {1} Patterns of Madness (page 194) cheyne George Cheyne (1671- 1743) According …
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    Sources:
    {1} Patterns of Madness (page 194)
    cheyne
    George Cheyne (1671- 1743)
    According to Allan Ingram, George Cheyne was a Scottish physician who practiced in London and Bath (Ingram 83).
    (view changes)
    5:47 pm

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